Continuing Education Courses Offered

“OSHA 30”
(30 HRS) CEU CLASS REGISTRATION

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This program satisfies the requirements of the Sheet Metal Workers Local Union No. 54 and the Houston Sheet Metal Contractors Association collective bargaining agreement for continuing education credit – the CEU credits will equal thirty (30) hours

 

Class dates subject to change with Instructors approval

 

 

Course Description: This Course covers thirty (30) hours of courses, required by the Occupational Safety & Health and Act (OSHA) that applies toward 30-hour Construction Industry course completion card. This module is comprised of 24 sections, each either one or two hours in length, and covering topics pertaining to regulations covered by Standard 29 CFR 1926. The successful completion of this course will help to meet the Construction Industry standards established by OSHA.

 

American Red Cross
1st AID / CPR Course
(8 HR) CEU CLASS REGISTRATION 

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This program satisfies the requirements of the Sheet Metal Workers Local Union No. 54 and the Houston Sheet Metal Contractors Association collective bargaining agreement for continuing education credit – the CEU credits will equal  (8) hours.

Course Description: Program designed to give you the confidence to respond in an emergency situation with skills that can save a life.

 

 

HOISTING, RIGGING, & SIGNALING CLASS
(8 HRS) CEU CLASS REGISTRATION

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This program satisfies the requirements of the Sheet Metal Workers Local Union No. 54 and the Houston Sheet Metal Contractors Association collective bargaining agreement for continuing education credit – the CEU credits will equal  (8) hours.

Course Description: Course will be in compliance with the new OSHA CFR 1926 Subpart CC for Cranes & Derricks Rule. Trainees will receive a pocket size hand signal chart 8" X 14" (cut out chart and fold to pocket size), a hand signal knowledge assessment piece, a hoisting and rigging qualification certificate form, signaling qualification certificate form, hoisting and rigging qualification certificate wallet card, signaling qualification wallet card, and OSHA support documents for the OSHA CFR 1926 Subpart CC for Cranes & Derricks Rule.
     
These compliance resources, issued upon completion of the ITI industrial curriculum and the SMOHIT hoisting and rigging materials, will meet the requirements of the new rule.

 

 

 

FOREMAN TRAINING
“Code of Excellence” as adopted by LU# 54
(6 HRS) CLASS

This program satisfies the requirements of the Sheet Metal Workers Local Union No. 54 and the Houston Sheet Metal Contractors Association collective bargaining agreement for Foreman Training credit – (6 ) hours of Foreman Training CEU’s will be received.

Course Description:  You will be presented with different perspectives that deal with the adopted

“CODE of EXCELLENCE” through the eyes of Management & Labor and how together they will creative and maintain a better image and a more productive member of the Unionized Sheet Metal Industry.

 

Welding Certifications

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Welding certifications available at our facilities, typically:

D9.1M/D9.1:2006 SHEET METAL WELDING CODE

Covers arc and braze welding requirements for nonstructural sheet metal fabrications using commonly welded metals available in sheet form up to and including 3 gauge, or 6.4 mm (0.250 in.). Applications of the code include heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems, food processing equipment, architectural sheet metal, and other nonstructural sheet metal applications. Sections include procedure and performance qualification, workmanship, and inspection. Nonmandatory annexes provide useful information on materials and processes. Not applicable when negative or positive pressure exceeds 30 kPa (5 psi). 70 pages, 29 figures, 10 tables, (2006).

 

 AWS D1.1
“Structural Welding Code – Steel”
“This Code covers the welding requirements for any type of welded structure made from the commonly used carbon and low alloy constructional steels.  Sections of this Code constitute a body of rules for the regulation of welding in steel construction.  Other sections of this Code contain additional rules applicable to specific types of structures, i.e., statically loaded structures, dynamically loaded structures, and tubular structures.”

 

 

Fire Life Safety Level 1




Scope: Level One competency in installation, inspection, and maintenance of fire, smoke, combination fire/smoke dampers, and ceiling
dampers in HVAC systems.

Summary: The management of fire and smoke systems has served as the underpinning of building codes in the U.S. for more than 100
years. Nearly all buildings intended for human occupancy are required by today’s codes to be designed with an assurance that, over the
life of the building, occupants will be reasonably safe from fire and smoke. Building codes require the design of an integrated system of
features such as walls, floors, ceiling, and structural members, and specific fire and smoke protection components, products, devices and
systems that reinforce and cover for one another in case of the failure of any one in the event of a fire. The overall intended building
performance and the depth of the designed redundancy is based on the objectives of the building owner and occupants.
Requirements to take the HVAC Fire Life Safety Level One Technician class:
• Basic knowledge about the responsibilities of architects, engineers and system designers
Take the class to complete a Level One Technician certification exam which includes a written test validating
the following subject matter and skills:
• Purpose of fire and smoke dampers for life safety and protection of property
• Terminology commonly used in conjunction with fire and smoke dampers
• Symbols commonly used on plans for HVAC systems
• Specifications for HVAC systems in SpecText or MasterSpec
• Skill in reading plans and specifications

 

 

Fire Life Safety Level 2

 

Scope: Level Two competency in controls, smoke management and stairway pressurization.

 Summary: The management of fire and smoke has served as the underpinning of building codes in the U.S. for more than 100 years.
Nearly all buildings intended for human occupancy are required by today’s codes to be designed with an assurance that, over the life of the
building, occupants will be reasonably safe from fire and smoke. Building codes require the design of an integrated system of features such
as walls, floors, ceiling, and structural members, as well as specific fire and smoke protection components, products, devices and systems
that reinforce and cover for one another in case of the failure of any one in the event of a fire. The overall intended building performance
and the depth of the designed redundancy is based on the objectives of the building owner and the occupants.
Requirements to take the HVAC Fire Life Safety Level Two Technician class:
• Must have attained HVAC Fire Life Safety Level One Certification *
• Must be employed by a qualified contractor
Take the class to complete a Level Two Technician certification exam which includes a written test validating the following skills:
• Knowledge of applicable NFPA, state and local building codes
• Qualifications to implement inspections and provide service and follow-up inspection/testing
• Knowledge of smoke control systems design and test criteria as defined by ASHRAE Guidelines 5-1994, NFPA101, 92A & 92B,
International Fire Code, SMACNA’s Fire Smoke and Radiation Damper Installation Guide for HVAC Systems, and UL.
• Capable to implement individual component and overall system performance testing of fire/smoke and fire/smoke combination
dampers and all related control components and interconnected system elements in a manner that will verify life safety compliance.
• Capable to review/assess HVAC system design drawings and design intent specifications in collaboration with design
professionals, specifically as related to fire/smoke and fire/smoke combination dampers, and the design intent of the fire containment
needs of the building.